University of Southern California

Research

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, OJJDP FY 201 Juvenile Justice Emergency Planning Demonstration Program

Slots:                                                     1, An entity may, however, be proposed as a subrecipient (subgrantee) in more than one application

Internal Deadline:                           Contact Office of Research if interested.

LOI:                                                        N/A                       

External Deadline:                          April 16, 2018 11:59pm ET

Award Information:                        Type:  Grant

Estimated Number of Awards: 4 to 7

Anticipated Amount: $50,000 to $150,000 per award, with an estimated total amount awarded of up to $350,000

Submission Process:                     PIs must submit their application as a Limited Submission through the Office of Research Application Portal: https://app.wizehive.com/webform/USCgrants

 

Materials to submit:

Link to Award:                                   https://www.ojjdp.gov/grants/solicitations/FY2018/EPD.pdf

Who May Serve as PI:                    Eligible applicants are limited to states (including territories), units of local government, federally recognized tribal governments as determined by the Secretary of the Interior, nonprofit organizations and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations), and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). All recipients and subrecipients (including any for-profit organization) must forgo any profit or management fee

Purpose:

This program will support the development, improvement, and/or implementation of emergency planning activities for state, tribal, county, and local juvenile justice residential facilities. Specific objectives include the following:

OJP strongly emphasizes the use of data and evidence in policymaking and program development in criminal justice, juvenile justice, and crime victim services. OJP is committed to:

OJP considers programs and practices to be evidence-based when their effectiveness has been demonstrated by causal evidence, generally obtained through one or more outcome evaluations. Causal evidence documents a relationship between an activity or intervention (including technology) and its intended outcome, including measuring the direction and size of a change, and the extent to which a change may be attributed to the activity or intervention. Causal evidence depends on the use of scientific methods to rule out, to the extent possible, alternative explanations for the documented change. The strength of causal evidence, based on the factors described above, will influence the degree to which OJP considers a program or practice to be evidence-based

Visit our Institutionally Limited Submission webpage for updates and other announcements.